GHOST RECON ADVANCED WARFIGHTER

27 Dec 2014 Posted by RILEY

 

DOWNLOAD NOW
dropbox.com


mediafire.com


4shared.com


zippyshare.com






A few of the four available battlefields also look sharp at times, at least when you don't run into graphical blips and bugs. At the ground level, AI-controlled foot soldiers phase right through stone walls and other obstacles like ghosts, while you get caught up on them and have to press a button to awkwardly volley over. Taking down zeppelins should be a dramatic affair, except that when they come plummeting out of the sky in a ball of flame, they actually phase through the ground and disappear rather than crash and explode. These quirks deaden the impact of third-person combat to an extent. It ain't easy being the Antichrist. In adventure/puzzle game Lucius, you experience the trials and tribulations of being the firstborn son of the big red guy with the horns. As you might expect given the young lad's pedigree, when he suffers growing pains, they involve a sizable body count. Lucifer is a demanding daddy, who wants souls in exchange for building the tyke up with telekinetic powers. All this contributes to a grim but promising setting where your only goal is to figure out how to murder the folks on the devil's hit list. Unfortunately, this darkly innovative premise is not implemented well, due to a reliance on pixel hunts, and you're dropped onto the scene with just pop's orders to start killing. There are other minor attractions throughout the Hong Kong of Sleeping Dogs. You can bet on cockfights, for instance, or sail out to a gambling barge for a bit of poker mahjong. And a social hub ranks you against your friends on mission performance as well as a host of other challenges, like longest bike jump and most cash earned by running down parking meters in rapid succession. Goofing around and pursuing high marks on these leaderboards is fun, but it's the atmospheric city and the varied story missions that make Sleeping Ghost Recon Advanced Warfighter an alluring adventure. It may have more violence than you'd want in a typical vacation, but this is still a fun-filled Hong Kong getaway that will leave you with many happy memories. There are other minor attractions throughout the Hong Kong of Sleeping Dogs. You can bet on cockfights, for instance, or sail out to a gambling barge for a bit of poker mahjong. And a social hub ranks you against your friends on mission performance as well as a host of other challenges, like longest bike jump and most cash earned by running down parking meters in rapid succession. Goofing around and pursuing high marks on these leaderboards is fun, but it's the atmospheric city and the varied story missions that make Sleeping Ghost Recon Advanced Warfighter an alluring adventure. It may have more violence than you'd want in a typical vacation, but this is still a fun-filled Hong Kong getaway that will leave you with many happy memories. There are other minor attractions throughout the Hong Kong of Sleeping Dogs. You can bet on cockfights, for instance, or sail out to a gambling barge for a bit of poker mahjong. And a social hub ranks you against your friends on mission performance as well as a host of other challenges, like longest bike jump and most cash earned by running down parking meters in rapid succession. Goofing around and pursuing high marks on these leaderboards is fun, but it's the atmospheric city and the varied story missions that make Sleeping Ghost Recon Advanced Warfighter an alluring adventure. It may have more violence than you'd want in a typical vacation, but this is still a fun-filled Hong Kong getaway that will leave you with many happy memories. A mix of all events makes up the Showdown Tour career mode. There are four stages to play through, each consisting of 15 events that take you on a tour of the world. There are the colourful lights and sharp corners of Tokyo; the dusty roads and sweeping drifts of the Baja California circuits; the slippery snow-covered slopes of Colorado; and the wide-open industrial spaces of Battersea. All are beautifully presented, showcasing the typically great circuit design that Codemasters is famed for. The ability to purchase new cars or upgrade their basic stats such as power and handling using money you earn is a nice incentive to progress, but without a narrative or character to develop, it can get a little tiresome. As before, most foes must be weakened with your flashlight, a road flare, or some other light source before they're vulnerable to attack. While it's a bummer that you have fewer opportunities for creatively using light to take down enemies, there's more raw firepower kicking around, which readily scratches a different itch than what you'd expect from the series. Picking up a hardware-store nail gun and piercing a nearby enemy's face full of sharp projectiles does indeed make you feel like a real badass. Other cool killing kits, such as a crossbow, a sawed-off shotgun, a Magnum, a mini-Uzi, and an assault rifle, offer plentiful and satisfying new ways to dispatch the nocturnal horrors that come crawling at you. A mix of all events makes up the Showdown Tour career mode. There are four stages to play through, each consisting of 15 events that take you on a tour of the world. There are the colourful lights and sharp corners of Tokyo; the dusty roads and sweeping drifts of the Baja California circuits; the slippery snow-covered slopes of Colorado; and the wide-open industrial spaces of Battersea. All are beautifully presented, showcasing the typically great circuit design that Codemasters is famed for. The ability to purchase new cars or upgrade their basic stats such as power and handling using money you earn is a nice incentive to progress, but without a narrative or character to develop, it can get a little tiresome. Defeated enemies land in The Island, a place of quiet servitude where you assign tasks for your own gain to the creatures that dared stand against you. If you want more treasures to purchase at the gift shop or energy if your life is getting drained too quickly, then make sure you have a monster working in a section that doles out the rewards you most desire. It's a neat idea, and seeing your demoralized foes doing busywork on your behalf is a clever way to reintroduce vanquished baddies, but the presents you receive don't have much impact on your adventure. Plus, you can assign only 80 monsters at a time to do your work, and because there are 100 in the game, one fifth of them might sit around doing nothing. Defeated enemies land in The Island, a place of quiet servitude where you assign tasks for your own gain to the creatures that dared stand against you. If you want more treasures to purchase at the gift shop or energy if your life is getting drained too quickly, then make sure you have a monster working in a section that doles out the rewards you most desire. It's a neat idea, and seeing your demoralized foes doing busywork on your behalf is a clever way to reintroduce vanquished baddies, but the presents you receive don't have much impact on your adventure. Plus, you can assign only 80 monsters at a time to do your work, and because there are 100 in the game, one fifth of them might sit around doing nothing. There are many peaks and valleys in An Elysian Tail, and it's that uneven rhythm that keeps this adventure from greatness. When you're mesmerized by the gorgeous environments or you're about to uncover a stubborn secret, it's hard to pull away from this engrossing downloadable game. But then you're forced to partake in repetitive combat or listen to drab characters prattle on endlessly, and you yearn for something better. But An Elysian Tail usually overcomes its missteps to offer a pleasurable experience. And once you're sucked in, there is so much content that you can spend more than a dozen hours exploring this land. Dust: An Elysian Tail struggles at times, but there's an awful lot of charm buried within. Each member of the 13-character roster has his or her own story to tell, and they have a lot to say. The overarching tale is the mystery of the P-1 Grand Prix: a fighting tournament taking place within the television world. For those who really want to sink their teeth into this, there are branching story paths within certain characters' storylines. These paths can offer additional insight or lead to some strange alternate endings--which adds some extra replayability. Sadly, the presentation of this mode is not as interesting. It's mostly two character portraits talking back and forth in 15- to 20-minute text-filled blocks--a static (if not efficient) form that will quickly bore all but the most enthusiastic. Each member of the 13-character roster has his or her own story to tell, and they have a lot to say. The overarching tale is the mystery of the P-1 Grand Prix: a fighting tournament taking place within the television world. For those who really want to sink their teeth into this, there are branching story paths within certain characters' storylines. These paths can offer additional insight or lead to some strange alternate endings--which adds some extra replayability. Sadly, the presentation of this mode is not as interesting. It's mostly two character portraits talking back and forth in 15- to 20-minute text-filled blocks--a static (if not efficient) form that will quickly bore all but the most enthusiastic. Clearly, then, you must venture forth and find three feathers. To find them, you must solve puzzles. Just like in Machinarium, many of the solutions lie on a single screen, or at least within a set level. There are very few fetch quests, and no long-winded dialogue trees for you to decipher, since your band of creatures speak only in simple chirps. Often it's simply a case of clicking things in the right order, figuring out the correct path to take, or interacting with objects in different ways by swinging, pushing, or squeezing them. A barking bug guards one of the feathers you seek. Your first few clicks do nothing but cause the bug to bark more. A subtle glow surrounding your creatures hints at a solution. Most of the minigame types are repeated, but the rhythms and forms they take are different to the point that the reuse of gametypes is never unwelcome. The music is wonderful; it's a mixture of original pieces and new arrangements of classical tunes. Action plays out on the top screen, and you have audio cues, the characters' own actions, and an optional button guide to aid your timing. None of the games are challenging enough to become frustrating, although you can purchase power-ups before each minigame that either speed your performance meter's increase or slow its decrease. If you're finding things too easy, there's also an optional feature that requires you to perfect the minigame before you can proceed. The commander is just one role, however, and the rest of the players have a diverse array of options to choose from. There's a lot here, and chances are, after a bit of experimentation, you'll find at least one aspect of the game you really click with. The best way to approach the game isn't to think of it as having an overall learning curve, but a number of smaller spikes; focus on one aspect of the game, and you'll learn plenty by way of observation while doing so. Thankfully, the game's been designed exceptionally well to allow this. Every facet of both the Frontiersmen (marines) and Kharaa (alien) sides is important. It's very much like Team Ghost Recon Advanced Warfighter in that respect: every role has its place and purpose. With this flexible class system, Guild Wars 2 jettisons typical MMOG roles (healer, tank, and so on). This works out better in the game's enjoyable five-man dungeons than you would think, for a few reasons. First of all, every class has some kind of healing skill, so while no one player is dedicated to keeping teammates alive, everyone can contribute to the party's general health. You can revive a fallen player, too--and should you fall, you can even make a last-ditch effort to rejoin the fight. Furthermore, Guild Wars 2 allows you to use environmental objects and weapons, from rocks to ballistae, so if you need to knock down a pesky spellcaster and no one has a helpful skill, just grab a stone and throw it. More good news comes in the form of some nice multiplayer options. Kung Fu Strike: The Warrior's Rise features a cooperative mode that lets you play each available campaign mission with a friend. Both fighters have separate life meters and appear within the same field, so there's good potential for fun as teamwork allows you to vanquish otherwise difficult foes. The number of moving parts can lead to slowdown in a lot of fights (an occasional problem even when you're playing alone), but it's a fair trade-off. There's also the option to engage in a Versus mode in one of four arenas. The multiplayer offerings add value to a game that requires anywhere from five to eight hours to work through its main campaign. Once your shot is airborne, you can swipe at your projectile to nudge it in different directions. Simply guiding the ball into walls, turrets, and towers brings them toppling down, but there are also sneering goblins, bundles of dynamite, and floating power-ups to aim for. Tagging these things can boost your score and amplify your destructive power, so plotting your shots is as important as executing them. Early levels make it very clear what the best trajectories are, and a powerful, well-aimed shot will reap big rewards. Such straightforward accuracy can get you through later levels, but to earn high scores and better medals, you need to be more subtle with your aim, shot strength, and midair manipulation. While the core of Rebellion remains familiar, the gameplay has been stretched in significant ways. The three races of the earlier Sins games--the Advent, the Trader Emergency Coalition, and the Vasari--have been expanded to six with the creation of Loyalist and Rebel factions for each group. All are tricked out with new capital ships and unique tech. This isn't the typical expansion where each side gets a handful of new ships and guns. There are radical changes here. Vasari Loyalists, for instance, have a hate on for pretty much all other races, and can eat planets. The Vasari Rebels, on the other hand, are more easygoing when it comes to buddying up with other species, and they specialize in nanotechnology. Halo 4 is every bit the massive shooter package that its predecessors were, and it holds the series' standard high. The thrilling and emotional return of Master Chief and Cortana is the highlight, and the campaign breaks new ground in narrative quality for the franchise. The top-notch competitive multiplayer picks up where Halo: Reach left off, infusing the action with some mainstream elements while still remaining undeniably unique. Spartan Ops may stay a mere sideshow or prove its worth in the weeks to come, but there's no doubting that the next planned Halo trilogy is off to a great start. 343 Industries should be proud of what it has accomplished, and you should be excited to experience it for yourself. It's a simple setup that works brilliantly throughout each of the game's five stages--particularly as those stages are so well designed to begin with. Small islands covered with skyscrapers and concrete buildings float in a large expanse of blue water, encouraging you to fly between them and explore. There's not much to see, however, except for a lot of things to blow up. Each island is filled with all manner of enemies. Some fire easily dodged lasers at you. Others fire streams of pink energy blobs that require deft reflexes to escape. And there are those--like submarines and warships--that fire homing missiles at you, filling the screen with dozens of tiny rockets all intent on blowing you to smithereens. It's a gentle introduction to the simple point-and-click mechanics of Deponia, which encourage you to click on anything and everything. Most objects can be fiddled with in some way by looking at them, picking them up, or combining them with other objects, which often results in a cheeky quip from Rufus himself: "That explains why I've had such cheesy dreams," he remarks as you remove a mouldy sock from u